More sewing…

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The back is done. The side pieces should actually have been cut from the pink linen, but there wasn’t enough.

A quick post today. Have not sewn that much due to some fever and me being out gallavanting. (It means one or two new posts!) Anyway, the back is done. Turned right side out and ironed. I will be back when I have managed to assemble front and back at shoulders and sides.

 

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Sewing…

Over the last days I have made some progress on the waistcoat. When I wrote my last post there was spring in the air and it felt so right to start on a summery linen waistcoat. Not anymore. Nearly freezing, and even snow a couple of times. Well, I pulled myself together, and over the last days I cut all the pieces, and started to sew. I really enjoy hand-stitching and could not imagine to do this particular garment differently. (Only if time was pressed or similiar…)

Photo by Regencygentleman

Front pieces cut and stitched. There is a seam along the entire left side. The strip of sturdy linen is sandwiched between the layers for interlining. It is necessary to have some structure along the buttons and button holes.

Photo by Regencygentleman

Both layers of both front pieces sewn together along both sides, then turned right side out. It is historically correct to treat outer fabric and lining as one piece. The edges appear somewhat uneven, but they are yet to be pressed.

Photo by Regencygentleman

The back: sewn together along the curved lines, both (identical) layers are then pinned together (right sides together) and stitched along the side and armscye.

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Difficult to see (as if I was sewing by candlelight), but right side done. Left side to go.

 

Photo by Regencygentleman

A closeup of my hand stitched seam.

Next step is to turn right side out, press the edges, and then pin the back to the front pieces, check fit, then baste together sides and shoulders. Must not forget to baste the hem. Then start on buttonholes and collar!

New project!

Photo by Regencygentleman

A small one, but still a project! This is going to be a new waistcoat. I have two finer ones (read here and here) and need something less formal for outings and other occasions. One can´t have too many waistcoats, ey! So I found this pink linen – I believe it was once a tea-towel – and I knew immediately what to do with it. I have spent many hours online analyzing portraits 1790-1810 with nice double-breasted waistcoats and generous lapels, but I think there is just enough material for a simple single-breasted dito.  The sheer, unbleached cotton/linen blend for back and lining, and half a dozen of these metal buttons. Could be nice when combined with the dark navy tailcoat and buff breeches. All hand stitched, of course.

Something like MacFadyen´s Darcy, below? Or the 1813 fashion plate?

Darcy6

1813

1795…

So, yesterday I attended the aforementioned event. Sadly, poor Mrs E. was indisposed, so I had only myself to escort. My attire was basically the same as last time, I wanted however to change or add something. I have posted one of my favourite portraits so many times now, but here it is again: Monsieur Pierre Seriziat by David, 1795. Since the event was an afternoon assembly, not a formal ball, it was not necessary to wear full dress. As Mr. S. below. But what else does he wear? Something quite significant: A wig! The transition years between the revolution and the Empire (or, if you prefer, the Georgian era and the Regency) still saw use of the powdered wig. (And it continued well into the first decade of the 1800´s with conservative and/or older gents.) There are many closeups in this post so bare with me.

1795

1795

As it happens I already had an acceptable a wig. It is an oldie from years back when I improved an ugly cheap-o wig (to use in a museum where I worked at that time). It is dark brown with highlights in it, powdered. The portrait shows a more frizzy wig, mine is not. The powder covers the shine, and that is a big improvement on synthetic hair. The side curls are large and positioned quite low, one on each side, continuing around the back, suitable for the 1790´s. The (talcum-) powder does not show well in the photos, but I admit I could have added more had we had any. Some of the curls only needed repinning, and it was set to go.

Photo by Regencygentleman aka Mr Tigercrona

The wig…

Photo by Regencygentleman aka Mr Tigercrona

… topped off with the new hat (still not improved).

Read more about hats here.

Photo by Regencygentleman aka Mr Tigercrona

1790´s style: Large curls (“boucle en rouleau”) and a cascade of locks at the back tied with black ribbon.

Photo by Regencygentleman aka Mr Tigercrona

The wig is an oldie that I styled many years ago. It has come to use now and then, and recently I remembered it and thought why not?

Right, enough posing in front of the camera. Time to go.

Right, enough posing in front of the camera. Time to go.

It was only a short ride by metro to the venue – the restored Kristinehof manor – and once there I met up with many friends and made new acquaintances. As soon as everybody was ready the music started to play. The musicians (and organizers of the event) were Wilhelm Dahllöf on cembalo; Nina Grigorjeva, bassoon; Thomas Schützer, transverse flute, and Ulrika Westerberg, violin. A treat to dance to live music!

Photo by Regencygentleman

Instructions for “Retour de Spa”. Our dance intructor was Ivar Asplund.

Photo by Regencygentleman

There were many beautiful 1780´s costumes in silks and printed cottons. The 1790´s uniform is from the Svea Livgarde or La Garde du Roi.

Photo by Regencygentleman

One of the ladies in a lovely gown, here in front of the Gustavian tiled stove.

Photo by Regencygentleman aka Mr Tigercrona

Dance programme

We all had a wonderful time as the afternoon light outside the windows faded. There is a good chance that March will bring more dancing. I certainly wouldn´t mind!

I feel I failed to ask everybody for permission to publish photos. If you happen to find yourself here and wish not to, please let me know.