Jane Austen´s World, Part 5

Since my last post I have been frantically sewing myself a costume for a ball in a different era (1680!). The film costumes are going back to Cosprop in London in less than two weeks, so I must hurry to walk you through the exhibition. (How on earth could it take me the lenght of a summer to do it?!)

The exhibition ends in the spirit of a Jane Austen novel: with a wedding reception. Three couples are lined up in the grand salon: Elinor and Edward, Marianne and Brandon, and Elizabeth and Darcy.

Jane Austen film costumes, Skokloster castle

Skokloster Castle

The painted baroque ceiling is stunning.

First, Jenny Beavan´s beautiful costumes from Sense and Sensibility (1995). The story ends with the wedding between Marianne and Brandon. The other couple to walk out to the cheering wedding party outside the church is Elinor and Edward. Despite all those unexpressed feelings between Elinor Dashwood and Edward Ferrars (superb acting by Thompson and Grant!) they end up getting married. Elinor is elegant in a printed muslin roundgown with a velvet spencer and a bonnet. Edward is dressed in black and white: black tailcoat, waistcoat, breeches and stockings. White linen shirt and cravat, and shoes with buckles. Nothing extravagant or avantgarde here, rather conservative and suitable for a country clergyman. They will settle in the parsonage on the Delaford estate and live sensibly – although comfortably – on 900 pounds per annum.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

The Ferrars, Elinor and Edward. Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Costume designer: Jenny Beavan and John Bright.

Emma Thompson and Hugh Grant as Elinor and Edward in Sense and Sensibility, 1995. This is of course the final scene outside the village church. Most people probably think it is a double wedding, but it is not. Elinor and Edward are already married and are acting as officiant/best man and matron of honour. (Explained by Emma Thompson in her film diaries.)

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Nice details on Elinor´s velvet spencer. The bows could be vintage. The roundgown has a delicate bobbin lace along the neckline and sleeves.

Sense and Sensibility 1995. Exhibition in Skokloster castle.

The bow in the back is never seen on screen but is a nice touch.

Sense and Sensibility 1995. Exhibition in Skokloster castle.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

The back, when we dressed the mannequin.

Have you noticed that Elinor is wearing this gown twice? It is first seen in one of the London scenes when the girls find themselves in a pickle, and Brandon turns up to help them. Emma Thompson in Sense and Sensibility, 1995.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Elinor´s bonnet with all the trimmings.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995

Elinor and Edward in Sense and Sensibility, 1995.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Edward´s suit. Very late eighteenth century, The restricted light makes it difficult to photograph black wool.

Nice silk buttons on Edward´s coat.

 

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Elinor´s gown has a long train. This is still the 1790´s.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

The table is ready for the wedding breakfast.

Marianne´s story is different. She falls passionately in love, gets her heart broken, and finds (a different sort of) love again. Dashing Willoughby is forced to marry another girl but loyal Colonel Brandon has been around throughout the story, and turns out to have qualities that go beyond the age gap. (In the beginning of the story Marianne finds Brandon a boring old man, he is at least 35!) This has been discussed for two centuries by now. Is she attracted to his quiet, gentemanlike manner? His interest in poetry and music? Or is it his estate Delaford and his fortune? Anyway, Marianne is fitted out in a magnificent gown in gold embroidered silk and tulle with a long train. The scene is over in a few seconds, so blink and you miss it.

Marianne and Colonel Brandon: Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman in Sense and Sensibility, 1995.

Colonel Brandon chooses to marry in his regimentals. He is transformed from an ‘old man in flannel waistcoat’ to a dashing husband. Earlier we were told that Brandon served in India, where ‘the air was full of spices’… Film scenes are seldom shot in sequence, so the wedding scene was Alan Rickman´s first day on set.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Wedding costumes, worn by Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman as Marianne and Colonel Brandon in Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Photo courtesy Jens Mohr.

Sense and Sensibilty 1995. Costume exhibit in Skokloster Castle.

Marianne´s gown and Colonel Brandon´s regimentals. The uniform consists of a red wool jacket with short tails, green cuffs and centre front. The jacket has gold trim and gold buttons, and a gold epaulette. White pantaloons and black hessian boots. A black silk stock and a deep red sash. (The sash was re-tied to the right after this picture was taken.)

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

The open robe is in cream net fabric with straw worked standing collar and a long train bordered with open work straw braid and heavy gold and silver beading. The underdress is a cream gauze over silk, studded with tiny silver stars.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

So much work went into this gown!

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

The net overdress with straw embroidery. This type of work was popular in the eighteenth century and several garments survive in museum collections.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Marianne´s bonnet is a delicate veil and flowers on a wire frame.

A young Kate Winslet wearing the costume. Sense and Sensibility, 1995.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Not the best picture, but here is a view of the back.

It took me some time to adjust the linen shirt collar and the black neck stock. This is how they should look.

Costumes from Sense and Sensibility 1995. Skokloster castle.

Epaulette on Colonel Brandon´s uniform.

Brandon´s black Hessian boots.

The final wedding clothes are from Pride and Prejudice, 1995. A spoiler alert is superfluous since we all know that Lizzy and Darcy end up marrying. Now, that IS a double wedding in the adaptation. (The weddings are mentioned only briefly in the novel.) Jane and Lizzy, the oldest Bennet girls, marry Bingley and Darcy. Dinah Collins designed the costumes.

A double wedding: Charles Bingley and Jane Bennet, Mr Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet. Pride and Prejudice, 1995. The familiar faces behind them look very solemn, but most of them, except miss Bingley,  are extremely thrilled.

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Elizabeth´s and Darcy´s wedding costumes, Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Lizzy is wearing a lace edged, v-necked silk pelisse over a striped silk dress. Darcy´s attire is correct morning wear: navy tailcoat, cream silk waistcoat, white moleskin pantaloons, and shoes (pumps).

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Decorative enamel buttons. A snap button keeps the little ‘belt’ in position.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Costume exhibit in Skokloster castle.

This is how it works: The pelisse and dress are partially sewn together. The striped skirt fastens with hooks and eyes to the gathered/pleated bodice.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Costume exhibit in Skokloster castle.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Costume exhibit in Skokloster Castle.

The enamel buttons are decorative as the bodice has hooks and eyes. There is a supportive under-bodice with a draw-string.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Costume exhibit in Skokloster castle.

Machine seams…

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Gathered sleeves on Lizzy´s pelisse.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Costume exhibit in Skokloster castle.

The fine lace continues around the back. The width of the skirt is gathered in two deep pleats.

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Lizzy´s bonnet. It was created by milliner Louise Macdonald.

Publicity still of Jennifer Ehle as Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Darcy´s morning suit.

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Darcy´s silk waistcoat and cravat. The linen shirt has a ruffle. (It is a challenge to tie a decent cravat when the mannequin lacks any type of neck…)

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

M-notch lapel.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Costume exhibit in Skokloster castle.

Darcy´s moleskin pantaloons. The fall and the waist buttons with two metal buttons respectively.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Costume exhibit in Skokloster castle.

Darcy´s watch fob with heart-shaped pendant.

Pride and Prejudice 1995. Costume exhbition in Skokloster castle.

Would you know it: There is no watch! A safety pin holds the fob (ribbon) to the waistcoat. Movie magic…

This costume is often seen in a set of publicity stills. Different pendant on watch fob, though. Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle in Pride and Prejudice, 1995. (Early still with a different wig on Ehle.)

Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth in Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Darcy is wearing a grey cloak in many pictures. I suppose there were several takes.

‘Three daughters married!’ A winter wedding requires an abundance of swan feathers. Alison Steadman as mrs Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

It has been a privilege to study these famous costumes in detail. Of course they didn´t know it back in the 1990´s, but today they are regarded as relics in the Austen-Regency-costuming community. Not everything is historically accurate, but the astounding work they did back then continue to inspire us. Is there a particular costume that you were inspired by? Out of the ones above I´d pick Darcy´s outfit any day! Elinor´s clothes may not look very special, but they are extremely well made, so I have a soft spot for them. But why choose at all?

Regencygentleman

Looking a bit grumpy because the show´s near the end… This particular day I had a couple of guided tours and acyually managed to tie a decent knot.

Next post will be about some of the costumes I made for the staff and visitors to this exhibition. And I ought to post some pictures from the ball…

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Jane Austen´s World, part 4

My goodness, how time flies! Since my return from summering in the country I have practically lived in the castle (work, that is – when day job and costuming meet, you know) preparing for the ball. It took place this past Saturday and I will write about it as soon as the pictures are delivered by the photographer. This one I took the morning after, a torn piece of vintage lace and a lost earring:

On 17 July, I was interviewed by one of the major and very serious radio-shows, trying to explain why I think Jane Austen and her work is more popular than ever, not the least here in Sweden. There probably is a link somewhere but I am not sharing here since it is entirely auf Schwedish. Jane Austen was of course everywhere in British media on that day.

I have more fantastic costumes to share with you, so let us continue with part four. I hope this exposé isn´t beginning to be tiresome. If you are new here or forgot what costumes I am referring to, read earlier posts about the exhibition here, here and here.

Coffee is served and the card table is ready in the drawing room. Enter Anne Elliot. The first costume is her lovely gown in pale yellow silk, as seen on actress Amanda Root in Persuasion (BBC, 1995). She is standing next to her cousin, the heir to Kellynch Hall, William Elliot. A young Samuel West played Elliot. Their first encounter is at Lyme Regis, and Elliot is dressed in the buff overcoat. Later, in Bath, he is often wearing a moss-green tailcoat, striped cotton pantaloons and checked waistcoat. Alexandra Byrne (Elizabeth, Elizabeth: The Golden Age, Finding Neverland) designed the costumes, and actually won the BAFTA TV Award, in competition with Pride and Prejudice (1995). I admit, the costumes are perfection! This adaptation has never been my favourite, but this year I have re-watched it several times and now I really like it, for being so true to the novel. I suppose I appreciate it more now when I am older…

Poor Anne is bullied by her horrible father and sisters. She certainly deserves a decent dress, doesn´t she?. This intrictate trim is hardly seen on screen.

Persuasion (1995): Ciaran Hinds as Captain Wentworth and Amanda Root as Anne Elliot. Costumes by Amanda Byrne.

Persuasion (1995): Captain Wentworth and Anne Elliot, here with cousin William Elliot, played by Samuel West.

This is the costume in the exhibition.

Mr Elliot´s cravat.

The mannequin is standing in front of a window, so it is difficult to photograph.

Daring combination, don´t you think?

Standing by the tapestry: Emma Woodhouse and Jane Fairfax, from the most recent adaptation of Emma (2009). Rosalind Ebbut designed the costumes. Her ambition was to introduce more colour and texture. Emma is wearing more vibrant colours than we have seen before. Ebbut wanted the ballgowns in shimmering pastels so she layered sheer fabrics, organza and net over silk taffeta. The girls are wearing these frocks to the Crown Inn ball.

Ballgowns from Emma (2009). The incredible suite of tapestries is French, and was a gift from Louis XIV to the Swedish amassador, Count Nils Bielke. The furniture is upholstered in British printed cotton, ca 1830.

Emma´s gown is a shimmering peach silk organza layered over silk taffeta,

Nice to se hand stitching on the belt.

And here is Romola Garai as Emma Woodhouse in Emma (2009).

Jane´s dress is pale blue net or tulle over white silk. The tulle is sprinkled with tiny sequins and the belt is silver metallic weave.

Laura Pyper was Jane Fairfax in Emma (2009).

Then we return to Pride and Prejudice. Formal wear this time: Elizabeth Bennet´s ballgown, Darcy´s black and white tails, Miss Bingley´s ballgown and Lady Catherine de Bourgh´s old fashioned robe à la Francaise.

I am referring to these costumes.

Lizzie Bennet´s gown in cream and gold. She is wearing it to the famous ball at Netherfield Park.

I am certain that Dinah Collin used sari silk. Look at the woven pattern on the belt.

Most of Lizzie´s dresses button in the back.

Lady Catherine and her nephew, Darcy.

Darcy´s tailcoat with breeches and white cravat, waistcoat and stockings, Very little has changed since then in formal wear.

I would wear this.

Four decorative buttons on each side.

Darcy´s pumps. (Secrets of the trade: only we can see that the mannequin´s feet are too big for Darcy´s/Firth´s pumps.

Judi Dench as Lady Catherine in Pride & Prejudice (2005).

This extravagant dress is Miss Bingley´s signature colour and design, isn´t it?

Intricate details on Miss Bingley´s gown. Dinah Collins said the haughty Bingley sisters would wear the Gucci of the day. The jewel silks are a contrast to the Bennet girls´innocent printed cottons.

 

Anna Chancellor gave a spot-on performance as unpleasant Caroline Bingley. Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

Most of my Regency garments are in my office this summer. Whenever I give a tour or do other work I can dress up in appropriate attire. The perfect mix of business and pleasure!

 

Jane Austen´s World, part 3

Greetings to all new and old followers! Or perhaps you are perusing, collecting ideas for your own Regency costume? This blog has a little bit of this and that, but main focus is on Regency fashions, and I try to share my sporadic costume projects. This year I have been involved professionally in staging Jane Austen´s World, a costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle, where I work as curator. Since I happen to have this blog I simply must blog about these familiar – some of them even iconic – film costumes in a series of posts.

We already met the Bennets, the Dashwoods and Emma Woodhouse in the daytime parlour. Read about them here and here. In the second room we step in to the bedchamber. It is a lovely guest room, but we added some furniture and other objects from the collections. The four-poster beds are ca 1800, with printed cotton hangings, British, ca 1830. A dressing table, mirror, wash basins, towels and a bidet were added. This is the intimate sphere, where the young ladies – could be the Dashwood sisters or Jane and Lizzie Bennet – are being dressed. We talk about personal hygiene and how cotton fabric became more accessible around 1800.

A pair of nightgowns flanking a pair of stays and a chemise. These are not specific to a certain production or certain characters, but came from stock. Everything else is from the museum collections. Photo by Jens Mohr, LSH.

British Regency fabric on the beds: the printed cotton is lovely, and in excellent condition.

This intimate sphere includes other important features in the world of Jane Austen. Writing letters, for example:

Many of these letters are crucial to the plot, and Jane Austen often includes them in her novels. We also wanted to mention one of Austen´s contemporaries, a female author who wasn´t afraid to be published and who had to fight for her beliefs: Mary Wollstonecraft.

 

This is where we introduce one of the most famous literary characters ever created, Mr. Darcy. He is sitting at his desk writing the long letter to Lizzie Bennet where he reveals Mr. Wickham´s true nature:

Mr. Darcy. The coat, breeches and boots are from ‘Pride & Prejudice’, 2005. (The film version starring Keira Knightley as Lizzie and Matthew MacFadyen as Darcy.) For some reason this particular costume does not resonate with me, so I didn´t bother to take that many pictures of it.

Pride and Prejudice 2005. Costume exhibition in Skokloster castle.

Looks better on Matthew MacFadyen, but still not my favourite coat. (Pride & Prejudice, 2005)

But then there is that certain costume that most people associate with Darcy (and Jane Austen adaptations, for that matter): The Shirt.

This ordinary linen shirt caused quite a buzz back in 1995. It was Colin Firth´s ticket to eternal stardom and started Darcymania in its many varieties.

Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy in the BBC Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

This phenomenon has been analysed so many times since then, so what else can I add? It is fun to observe our visitors when they see the shirt and decide (if not sooner) that now is the time to take pictures.

Marianne Dashwood is there too, with her letters to that scoundrel Willoughby. Marianne Dashwood´s day gown is exhibited. It was designed by Jenny Beavan and worn by Kate Winslet in several scenes in Sense and Sensibility, 1995. It is a sleeveless silk robe with v-neck collar over a cotton dress. It is easy to miss it on screen, but it is a beautiful gown, with many details. Of course Marianne is the romantic, passionate sister, something that nearly kills her. Her relationship with Willoughby does not end well. It is interesting that both of them ignore propriety in several ways. On one of their outings they visit Willoughby´s estate, unshaperoned. That is enough to ruin a girl´s reputation in Regency society. Marianne seeks up Willoughby at the ball in London, again very unladylike behaviour. Society would frown upon a young lady writing (passionate!) letters to a gentleman to whom she isn´t related. We learn that there never was an engagement.

Marianne´s dress from Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Scattered on the desk is her desperate letters to Willoughby, and finally his polite but cold reply. Photo by Jens Mohr, LSH.

A drawstring closes the neckline. The silk dress has hooks and eyes on right hand side, concealed by the belt.

The silk appears to be either hand painted or hand printed. Or stencilled? Notice the amount of fabric that is pleated at the back? This create the elegant Empire style silhouette, so make sure to use enough material in your gowns, ladies!

This reticule came with the dress, so Marianne had to carry one of her letters to Willoughby in it.

Kate Winslet as Marianne in Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Here with Emma Thompson, Imogen Stubbs and director Ang Lee.

This costume is seen earlier in the film when the girls gather reeds and Colonel Brandon offers Marianne a knife. They are still in mourning so Marianne is wearing a black lace cape or shawl with it.

Or does she? Here she is wearing only the cotton dress with a sleeveless green velvet spencer. Now I´m confused. And I have an excuse to go and watch the film.

 

Jane Austen´s World, part 2

This spring has been hectic but so much fun! Last time I introduced the exhibition we have been working on. Today we are taking a look at the Bennets! First, a group from the 1995 BBC ‘Pride and Prejudice’ – perhaps the best known costumes by now. They were designed by Dinah Collin and we have to say her team did a wonderful job. This was the beginning of the modern Austen-era, so they had to make nearly every costume from scratch. It was a challenge to find the right fabrics, so they screen printed patterns on muslins, and used a lot of Indian sari-fabrics.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Jane Bennet´s cotton dress and linen spencer. Soft pastels suit Jane´s sweet disposition.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Elizabeth Bennet often wears robust, earthy tones. This is her silk dress and brown embroidered spencer.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

These two ensembles are seen in the very beginning of the story when the Bennets are walking home from church, and Mrs Bennet is going on about a certain new neighbour. Susannah Harker played Jane and Jennifer Ehle WAS Elizabeth. Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

Lizzie wears the silk dress frequently. Perhaps you rememember it from the disastruous first proposal… The girls´gowns all seem to have buttons in the back, which was coming in fashion in the 1810´s.

Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

It was nice to create the daily mess in the Bennets´ drawing room. The girls have different interests. Mary is reading or playing the pianoforte, Kitty and Lydia are trimming a bonnet, and Jane is embroidering. The portrait is the real-life countess Brahe who lived in Skokloster castle during the first half of the 19th century.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

And then there is of course Mrs Bennet. Her light wool dress with printed floral pattern.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Mrs B wears a frilled cap, a matching lace shawl and a coral necklace.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

The dress is front-closing. A narrow silk ribbon ties the neckline. Hooks and snaps (!) fasten the skirt. The gauzy chemisette is tied around the waist.

The mannequin lacks mrs B´s persona, portrayed so annoyingly and spot-on by Allison Steadman. It is easier to see the cap and frills here. Benjamin Withrow played mr Bennet. At first glance she is the demanding wife and he is the long suffering husband, but I have greater sympathy with her today. She is only trying to secure the girls´future, since her husband seems to have given up, spending his days in the library, or talking to her in a patronising tone…

This dress has been used in several other productions. Read more about it over on Recycled movie costumes.

This concludes the first of several rooms. The following two rooms are very different. Through a bedroom is  the tower room packed with information for those who wish to learn more about the world of Jane Austen. There are interviews with Dinah Collin and Jenny Beavan, and a handful of Swedish experts on fashion history, English literature and of course Jane Austen.

Pride and Prejudice, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

This exquisite piece of furniture, ca 1750, doubles as ‘Jane Austen´s desk’. Piles of Miss Austen´s letters and manuscripts are scattered on the desk and chair.

Come back soon for more!

Jane Austen´s World

Dear all, the exhibition opened one month ago, and since then my intention has been to share the marvellous costumes with you. That moment has come, finally! I am afraid I have tons of pictures by now, so it took me the better part of the day to sort them out. Therefore I decided to do it in several installments.

Many of the costumes have been on tour for years by now, so you might think this is nothing to be excited about.  But what a ‘nerd-fest’ it is!  A handful of these costumes were in Sweden only last summer. Little did I know then I would be working with them myself one year later! The costumes, about 30 in total, were selected by us and rented from Cosprop, the renowned costumier in London.

The team is very happy with how the exhibition turned out, and we have had a lot of attention from media. And we love when visitors turn up in Regency fashions.

The costumes are of course lovely, but the other star of the show is the setting. This part of the castle is usually closed to the public, which is a shame because the rooms are stunning. They are a mix of Baroque ceilings, fireplaces and wainscoting, and late 18th to early 19th century neoclassical furnishings and paintings. It was rather easy to recreate the atmosphere you see in the different adaptations. We moved some furniture and re-arranged the paintings.

The weeks leading up to the opening were hectic, as always, but it was a fairly smooth process.

The opening ceremony was on 1 June. Friends and associates (the usual suspects) were invited to enjoy afternoon tea in the ground floor gallery. The British ambassador mr David Hearn graciously accepted to give the opening speech. When my co-workers aren´t busy posing as the Dashwood sisters, their business titles are conservator and administrator, respectively. Several of the frocks I made this spring premiered on this day. Some of the guests wore Regency attire, too.

These silhouettes lead the way up to the third floor.

A bit too dark, but this is the introduction in the third floor gallery, before entering the suite of rooms where the costumes are.

The first costume is from the Kate Beckinsale ‘Emma’, the ITV television production from 1996.Screen writer Andrew Davies was joined by the production team from Pride and Prejudice the year before. Jenny Beavan designed the costumes.

Emma´s nice 3/4 length velvet coat is worn over a printed muslin dress, accessorised with a frilled collar. The velvet is plum coloured, but it was obviously difficult for me to photograph… There are several adaptations of the novel. They all have their pros and cons. I would say that Kate Beckinsale does a good job here and it stays fairly close to the book. I don´t care much for mr Elton in this one though. The story is set in 1816, when the novel was published, which is reflected by the costumes. Waists were as high as they could go and skirts were shorter, starting to show some ancle.

Emma, 1996. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Emma, 1996. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Emma, 1996. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Emma, 1996. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Interesting back. Kate Beckinsale named this costume “The Dung beetle”.

Emma 1996. ITV Archive

As seen on Kate Beckinsale as Emma Woodhouse.

Emma´s printed dress was featured in the promotion pictures. Here with Mark Strong as Knightley.

This vignette illustrates Regency etiquette. As the highest ranking lady in Highbury Emma Woodhouse has obligations, such as helping the poor and visiting the tiresome chatterbox miss Bates.

The following set of costumes is from ‘Sense and Sensibility’, 1995. This is the big screen adaptation directed by Ang Lee. Emma Thompson wrote the script and was awarded with both a Bafta and an Oscar. She also played Elinor and a young Kate Winslet was Marianne. The cast is very impressive with formidable actors such as Elizabeth Spriggs, Harriet Walter and Hugh Laurie, only to name a few. I always liked the costumes in this version. They were designed by award-winning Jenny Beavan and John Bright.

This is where we can discuss the precarious situation women could find themselves in when the family estate was entailed away on the male line.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Kate Winslet played Marianne and Hugh Grant was Edward Ferrars.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Marianne´s red printed dress and grey redingote. This looks untidy, as I took the photo when the mannequin was dressed. You can see how the dress fastens with small hooks and eyes under the bust.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Marianne´s redingote.

This is when mrs Dashwood and her daughters move to Barton Cottage in Devonshire.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Edward Ferrar´s double-breasted waistcoat and cutaway tailcoat. He wore this outfit many times, including the proposal scene. I arranged the collars and tied the cravats, and was truly impressed by the high quality both in material and execution.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castl

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Standing to the left is Elinor Dashwood´s riding habit. I like how the jacket is constructed in the 18th century manner. The front is folded to shape, and continues to the shoulder seam, see below. I also like how the waist is raised, but not directly under the bust, indicating the transitional silhoutte 1795-1800.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Asuetn costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Sense and Sensibility, 1995. Jane Asuetn costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

The coat and striped waistcoat are actually sewn together. I don´t know how accurate it is. The striped fabric is very similar to Edward´s waistcoat. Perhaps they came from the same manufacturer? Photo by Jens Mohr.

And here they both are, in the beginning of the story, before the Dashwoods move to the cottage and Edward is sent off to mama.

Next we have the Bennets, so over to Longbourn!

The Jane Austen costume exhibition in Skokloster Castle.

Fabulous costumes!

With less than a week before the opening of the Jane Austen exhibition everything is more or less installed, with only some minor adjustments left to be done. (Although enough to keep us busy!)

I am very impressed by the quality of the costumes. A lot of hand sewn seams and delicate materials on the gowns and the coats are properly tailored. Jenny Beavan and Dinah Collins obviously know their business.

Here are only a few samples for all you Jane Austen-fans out there:

Photo by Regencygentleman

Miss Bingley’s evening frock is suitably grand.

Photo by Regencygentleman

One of Miss Marianne Dashwood’s lovely gowns. (Kate Winslet is petite.)

Photo by Regencygentleman

Another beatifully made gown. This one is hardly seen on screen. Can you guess which one it is?

The Costumes have arrived!

Photo by Regencygentleman

Yesterday these boxes arrived. They are not just any boxes. They contained the legendary costumes that will go on display, carefully packed on top of hatboxes and heavier shoes and boots.

Our textile conservators started to unpack them and I tried not to drool too much, but took a few quick photos. Starting today, they will be steamed if needed and mounted on to mannequins.  I will keep you posted.

Photo by Regencygentleman
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The Jane Austen Exhibition

Photo: Jens Mohr, LSH

We have hectic days at work now with everything that needs to be done before the palace gates open again in May. The conservators are spring cleaning the state apartments, the shop is stocked with new goods, guides are being hired, and countless other things. Perhaps you remember me mentioning some time ago that the summer exhibition is Jane Austen? The focus will be thirty costumes (supplied by Cosprop in London) as seen in Pride and Prejudice (1995), Sense and Sensibility (1995), Persuasion (1995), Emma (1996 and 2009), and Pride & Prejudice (2005). We are also digging out a handful of not too shabby historical costumes from the museum collections.

Photo by Jens Mohr, LSH

Serious drama going on here.

Today is exactly two months before the opening. The press release and pictures were made public a few weeks ago. Here is an excerpt from the English version (not my translation):

Beautiful scenery surrounds the film costumes worn by actors such as Kate Winslet, Hugh Grant and Colin Firth. Costumes for many people forever linked with characters such as Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy. In the Jane Austen’s world exhibition, these characters open the doors to tales of the lifestyle, dilemmas and fashions during the early 1800s.

Magnificent costumes in a historical setting
The costumes are presented in the castle’s guest suites, furnished with objects from the late 1700s and early 1800s. This is a unique opportunity to experience parts of the castle which are not normally open to the general public. The objects on display include the fantastic bridal gown worn by Marianne Dashwood (played by Kate Winslet) from the film Sense and Sensibility and not least the once soaked shirt worn by Mr. Darcy (played by Colin Firth) in the BBC series of Pride and Prejudice. The historical setting of Skokloster Castle is a perfect stage for the exhibition, which presents a period coloured by magnificent clothing, narrow female spheres and strict etiquette.

Jane Austen – always current
Jane Austen is one of the world’s most read authors, and her almost 200-year old novels are more popular than ever, with new editions, interpretations, dramatisations and film versions of her works being released constantly. In her novels, Austen succeeds in combining an easy style with sharp social criticism concealed beneath emotionally charged intrigue.

‘Jane Austen was a perceptive observer of the strict social patterns that permeated the privileged social class to which she belonged. Austen’s young heroines struggle against and with the limitations of their period. For many women, marriage was the only opportunity way they could support themselves. And just like in her books, women are at the centre of Jane Austen’s world. Marriage as a guarantor of the survival of the family is a theme that also forms part of the history of Skokloster Castle. In the exhibition, you can also follow the “Meanwhile at Skokloster” track, which presents a number of women at Skokloster’, explains Annika Williams, curator of the exhibition at Skokloster Castle.

This summer, Skokloster Castle is offering a range of programme activities related to the exhibition, including themed viewings, lectures, a picnic in the castle grounds, Regency dancing, costume displays, a ball and afternoon teas with guest speakers. All in the true spirit of Jane Austen. Guided tours every day.

How about that! If you wish to know more, follow this link.

My co-workers are absolutely wonderful and their dedication to Jane Austen and the Regency era is impressive. At times we indulge in a veritable nerd-fest, I am afraid.

The gorgeous promotion photos accompanying today´s post were taken by our photographer, Jens Mohr. It took considerable time to agree on what type of pictures we wanted in terms of style and atmosphere. We definitely wanted to show a strong and confident young lady, one that might take matters in her own hands instead of passively waiting for a suitor.

You cannot see, but the temperature was near freezing in the state appartments back in early February when Elinor and I tried to look our best in Regency finery, or at least tried to stop shaking… They say the camera puts on extra weight, but it certainly does not help when one is wearing a warm sweater under waistcoat and all. (In hindsight I know I should not have worn it.) Of course Elinor, poor thing, was lovely in the summery open robe and sheer linen dress, channelling her inner Lizzie Bennet. She also managed to not attract pneumonia. Or so I believe. I presented the two gowns here.

Photo by Jens Mohr, LSH

Photo by Jens Mohr, LSH

Next time I will write about which gentlemen´s costumes that will go on display in the exhibition.

Oh, and we have released tickets to the Jane Austen ball in August, and the rest of the programmes. It is going to be so much fun! (And hard work.)

Announcements

Baroque grandeur has replaced my usual Empire elegance. At least professionally. This autumn I moved on to a new position as curator at Skokloster castle, a magnificent baroque palace one hour from Stockholm. It is in fact the largest private house ever built in Sweden. That is the reason why there has been very little time for blogging. But wait, there is more.

Skokloster Castle was built 1654-1676.

I reached for my non-existing smelling salts when my new colleagues informed me on the second day that next summer we will show Costumes From The Jane Austen Adaptations! About five and twenty costumes will be shipped over from Cosprop in London! The ballroom-sized guest rooms were refurbished in the neoclassical style in the early nineteenth century and make the perfect setting for some of the famous costumes from Pride and Prejudice 1995, Sense and Sensibility 1996, Emma 1996, Pride & Prejudice 2005, and I think even Persuasion 2008. Yes, Darcy´s shirt is included and Marianne Dashwoods wedding gown. But so is at least one of Mrs Bennet’s frocks. How about that!  Of course I will write more about this as things move ahead. Now is your chance make a wish list if you need more information or certain closeups of specific garments.

This is what I do for a living. Sometimes life is good.

Photo by Regencygentleman aka mr Tigercrona

Greetings from my “office”.

Now the palace is practically a baroque-era time capsule. It is one of the largest and best preserved private palaces in Europe, along the likes of Blenheim Palace and Chatsworth. Unlike them, Skokloster is no longer a residence. It was sold to the nation in 1967, and has been a museum since.

Photo by Regencygentleman

The exterior was rather old fashioned in the 1650s, but perhaps Count Wrangel did not want to seem too nouveau riche.

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The King´s hall. The ceilings are incredible. A stucco dragon holds the chandelier between her teeth. The chandelier is hanging in its original place at least since 1672, which makes it the oldest known chandelier still in its original position. Photo courtesy of Skokloster castle.

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The Count Wrangel´s state bedroom. The bed hangings are in silk taffeta with silver spangles. The Wrangels were international jet set, and were given diplomatic gifts by people like Louis XIV and hired one of the Bachs as court musician.

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The Armoury. View of one of sveral rooms filled with armour, shooting guns, swords, and curious objects from the new world. The chest to the right holds unique garments and tools from Native Americans in Delaware, shipped over to Sweden in the 1660s. Everything still in place according to inventories from 1690-1700. Photo courtesy of Skokloster castle.

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The unfinished banquet hall. The Wrangels ran out of cash and the political climate became harsh towards the high-ranking nobility in the 1670s. The only surviving building site, complete with tools and machinery, since the seventeenth century.

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The Yellow Bedroom, used by one of the last private owners. (Seen on the desk alongside a signed photograph of Emperor, then Crown Prince, Akihito, who stayed at the castle in 1954.

The Library.

Enough boasting. Over to some costume talk!

Photo by Regencygentleman aka mr Tigercrona

Meet the new hobbit! Trying on garments used by our education officers. This particular servant´s attire is terrific, but seriously, if I am ever invited to a Lord of the Rings party, I´d borrow this and only add pointed ears and hairy feet…

Our selfie-spot, a baroque banquet.

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Eleven year-old Vilmer posing at the table wearing a 165os doublet I quickly threw together .

Can you believe it, I “inherited” a stash with bolts of linen and broadcloth! So I decided to sew a 1630-40s doublet for kids to try on in our family room. It was a fun and easy project, but I made sure to thoroughly starch the collar and cuffs with corn starch.

A grey satin had to be made into a 1660s bodice and petticoat. I used Janet Arnold´s pattern. This has taken me a little longer to finish.

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When visiting another version of a Jane Austen costume exhibit in July.

Seven Costumes and A Castle

Summer greetings to all of you! I have not travelled to the Lake District, nor have I picked strawberries. But I have seen an exhibition that might interest you. First, some familiar faces. All of them are formidable actors portraying some of our favourite Jane Austen-characters. Now, what do these have in common?

Lizzie and Darcy

This week I saw these very costumes!

This lovely photo caught my eye some time ago:

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It is promotion for the summer exhibition at Tjolöholm Castle: Costumes from three famous Jane Austen adaptations! These fine ladies and the gent are reenactors based on the westcoast, so I am not acquainted with them. Back in June there was a Regency style picknick and they have arranged one or two themed afternoon teas. It is some hours away from Stockholm, and with work and all, I was unable to attend.

On a peninsula on the Swedish westcoast, overlooking the sea, is Tjolöholm Castle. It was built around 1900 by the wealthy Dickson family of Gothenburg. They had Scottish/British ancestry and chose to build their country retreat in the Arts & Crafts style with furnishings from Liberty. The castle is now a museum. Read more about it here. Dear Mrs E and I decided to pay them a visit.

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Tjolöholm Castle.

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English gardens overlooking the sea.

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Photography was not allowed inside the castle, but I quickly took this photo before the tour started. This impressive steampunk-esque chandelier was hanging over the billiard table.

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The Dicksons installed several state-of-the-art bathrooms.

All of this is lovely. You are only allowed inside on a guided tour, which we enjoyed, since it was our first visit. But our main reason for going there was of course the exhibition.

A perfect way to build up ones expectations was to visit the café in the old stables. There was a space with a generous amount of garments that visitors were allowed to try on. They were provided by students at the Gothenburg costume academy, and they were really well made. (I admit, I examined several of them up close.) Unfortunately there was a rack with Elizabethan costumes as well, a bonus from last year´s summer exhibition with costumes from the Cate Blanchett Elizabeth films, which obviously caused some confusion. Too bad since the general Swedish public still seem to have a limited idea of Regency era fashions. No wonder then that a handful of nice spencers in colourful velvets were hanging with Tudor doublets, and a farthingale-thing was mixed with the empire frocks. The museum should either remove the 17th century garments or put really obvious tags on them.

So over to the stars – the costumes, provided by Cosprop. These were on display in the castle, on the third floor. You had to go on the guided tour to get there, and the group was given just enough time to enjoy the exhibit. Photographs were allowed. What a treat it was! I suppose these costumes have been on tour for years now. (I have vague memories of seeing quite many of them back in the late nineties.)

Anyway, who could forget the unexpected encounter between Lizzie Bennet and Mr Darcy at Pemberley? The famous pond-scene that started Darcymania and made Colin Firth a star? Just to remind you:

Lizzie and Darcy

Awkward encounter at Pemberley. Jennifer Ehle as Elizabeth Bennet and Colin Firth as Mr Darcy. The BBC Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

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The famous shirt! With the breeches, boots, and additional garments on the bench. (The boots should have wooden boot trees or they loose their shape and the leather might crack.)

The costume designer for Pride and Prejudice (1995) was Dinah Collin, and she was awarded with an Emmy for her outstanding work. I still think the costumes are very good, and they continue to be an inspiration to many of us. Keep in mind though that they are theatrical costumes, not extant garments, and therefore an interpretation of the era. Someone commented on the unlikely usage of the same pattern for all of Lizzie´s frocks and the “pretty” girls are always wearing low cut evening gowns, even at daytime. Read more about these issues over on Frock Flicks. IMHO the gentlemen´s costumes were perfect, from fashion-forward Darcy and Bingley, to the more conservative Messrs Bennet, Gardiner, and not the least , Collins.

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I am not entirely sure I liked this display. The other fine garments on the bench just like that? Most visitors in our group just hurried on, unaware of the importance of this “relic”. I fully understand a museum like this works on a budget and staff is limited. But the iconic shirt was simply lacking the drama. I would have given it more space, and had added at least some images of Colin Firth as Mr Darcy. Why not more about the attention in media back in 1995? Explain the basics of gentlemen´s fashions during the Regency? There were some leaflets nearby, I admit, but I wanted to use those precious minutes on the actual costumes.

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This image is from the internet. It is possible that the boots have wood blocks here and the coat, waistcoat and hat are arranged differently. It looks more tidy.

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Still a bit disturbed by this (thinking that I would have added some quiet music in the background, soundtrack?), but moving on to Lizzie Bennet´s gown, spencer, and bonnet. What I did like was the possibility to get really close, something that is rare in a museum. (This is probably the closest I ever get to Jennifer Ehle…)

Photo by Regencygentleman

A closeup of the spencer. A nice cinnamon coloured linen (or wool?) with fine details. The gown was made of cotton, with the print used inside out. I tried to determine if  the garments were hand sewn, but it was difficult to tell.

Photo by Regencygentleman

Nice diamond-shaped back with piping.

In three adjoining rooms were costumes from the Ang Lee/Emma Thompson Sense and Sensibility (1995). This story is set a few years earlier, somewhere in the late 1790´s. The silhouette is slightly different from P&P; we see fuller skirts, and narrow, 3/4 sleeves. Costume designers Jenny Beavan and John Bright were nominated for a Bafta and an Oscar, and they certainly did a great job! My favourite costumes among the gents are seen on Colonel Brandon, Sir John, and that awful Willoughby. Their costumes were not included in this exhibition, though.

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Marianne Dashwood (Kate Winslet, hello!) wearing the pelisse and bonnet…

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… that were in a room where you could only stand in the doorway. (Apologies for looking like a stalker.) I find this particular type of pelisse or coat rather uninteresting. But I like the bonnet and the floral sprigged dress, which is barely visible.

Kate Winslet

It looks like this dress (far right). I would gladly have seen more of it. (Sense and Sensibility, 1995)

Publicity photo from Sense and Sensibility (1995): Emma Thompson and Hugh Grant as Elinor Dashwood and Edward Ferrars. (They were young back then!) Both of these outfits were on display, but in separate rooms.

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Costumes worn by Edward and Elinor. The lavender gown is of course the one Elinor wears to the ball in London:

The gown is nicely executed. I managed to see hand stitching at the belt and the trim, and the hook-and-eye closure. This is also a good example on the importance of correct undergarments. Emma Thompson is wearing a pair of good stays, that make the most of her assets.

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Edward´s tailcoat looks perfectly fine here, but I always thought the fit was too loose on Hugh Grant. (Of course this shows that his character Edwars Ferrars is completely uninterested in trivial things such as fashion.) The striped double-breasted waistcoat is easy to reckognize.

Photo by Regencegentleman

Wait a minute. This tailcoat looks very tailored. Not nearly as loose fitting as Hugh Grant´s coat above. If going by the cut of the collar, structure of the weave, and colour, I say it is a coat worn by Edward Ferrars, yes, but by Dan Stevens in the 2008 miniseries Sense and Sensibility. What do you think?

Edward Ferrars

Again, Dan Stevens as Edward Ferrars, in the 2008 Sense and Sensibility. Look at the m-notch collar and the light gathering on the sleeve cap. Hmm.

Photo by Regencygentleman aka Mr Tigercrona

Moving on to Elinor´s other gown, the checked cross-front that we see a lot in the film.

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Elinor (Emma Thompson) wears this gown many times, including the important proposal scene.

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Closeup of the sheer embroidered trim. Notice how the muslin apron is buttoned on. When Elinor is doing heavier gardening in front of the cottage she covers it with a thicker apron:

The exhibition had one final costume, and that was something completely different: A robe a la Francaise. This is from the 2005 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice. (The “Keira Knightley” or the “Pig” version.) This time they decided to move back the story to the 1790´s when Jane Austen originally wrote the novel. This means transitional fashions between the Georgian era and the Regency. Was it good or not? This has been discussed ever since. Here, and here. Costume designer Jacqueline Durran was nominated for a Bafta and an Oscar.

The purple gown was worn by no other than the great Judi Dench as Lady Catherine de Bourgh. This portayal is not my favourite. Judi´s Lady Catherine is hot tempered and feisty, not as sly and manipulative as Lady Catherine in the 1995 version. Judi Dench is also very tanned, which Lady Catherine most certainly wouldn´t be. It is nevertheless a splendid gown.

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Judi Dench as Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Pride & Prejudice, 2005. Gorgeous hair!

To sum this up: The exhibition was small and tucked away in this castle, but should be a treat for every dedicated Jane Austen-fan. Have you seen any of these costumes? Do tell!